Friday, June 27, 2014

The Wishing Tree

Copyright Madison Woods


It grows in the backyard, our very own Kalpavriksha, the tree of fulfilment of wishes and desires.

We noticed it the day we moved in, the cylindrical trunk with thick tapering branches, like an ‘upside-down tree’. The bark greyish brown variously folded and seamed from years of growth.

‘I am bored I wish I had friends here’.

Explore the tree we said and up in its branches the neighbouring boys came into sight and the start of summers of friendship.

Our mind is the Kaplavriksha, rather than asking for a wish: you could actually make it happen if you so desired.



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Written for Friday Fictioneers. Word Count : 100

When you think about it trees appear in myths and legends from around the world. They form the bridge between worlds, real and imaginary, as sources of life and wisdom, and as a symbol of life and fertility. And the basis of this week's contribution by the Fictioneers :-)

12 comments :

  1. What a lovely idea for the story, Subroto. Your vivid description of the tree made it seem old and wise. I enjoyed this story.

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    1. Thank you Karen I am glad you liked it. That tree lent itself to the story and I just wanted to incorporate some elements of mythology to it.

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  2. Dear Subroto,

    It sounds like a wonderful tree and a great place for little boys to congregate. Imaginative and clever story.

    I could see this one being developed into a children's story with illustrations.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

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    1. Thank you Rochelle, given the opportunity little kids can still entertain themselves without technology involved.
      I think my days of 'make-up' stories are behind me now :-) But thank you for that suggestion.

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  3. A lovely thought... making wishes come true, not by just waiting for them, but by taking the initiative to make them happen. Lovely story.

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    1. Thank you Ruth for reading and commenting, so glad that you liked the story.

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  4. Nice story, Subroto - and I'm glad the child found friends.

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    1. Thanks Lizy, glad you liked it. I think kids don't have the hang-ups that adults have and make friends far more easily.

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  5. Anonymous6:59 PM

    Dear Subroto, Sounds like perfect fun for some kids this summer - or any summer. Good job! Nan :)

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    1. Thanks Nan, glad you liked it. Being active by getting out and playing is always more fun :-)

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  6. Subroto, The program seems to have wiped out my first comment. What I said was: Good story. I especially liked the addition that our mind is actually that tree. Well written. : ) ---Susan

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    1. Thank you Susan. "Kalpa" means to imagine and we all know that imagination has no limits :-)

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