Wednesday, October 28, 2015

Still Waters

© Dale Rogerson

He stood in the first flush of the morning savoring a moment of calm contemplation.  

All that could be heard was the gentle swishing sound of the water lapping softly at the bank of the lake.  The damp smell of the marshy wetlands permeated the air as he watched birds skim over the surface of the lake. 

After a lifetime of work tucked in cloistered rooms he felt a sense of peace as never before.  Popping out hesitantly from the water was the central leg of the swivel armchair and its ergonomic backrest.

The boss fortunately was in deeper waters.

**

Written for the Friday Fictioneers  Word Count : 100.  

Once you see the chair you can't 'unsee' it.  To read what the other Friday Fictioneers saw click here

36 comments :

  1. May we take that as a resignation?
    Good piece.

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    1. Might get head hunted for the next assignment. Thanks for your comments Mick, I am glad you liked it.

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  2. He/she has been liberated from the boss! Good piece indeed.

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    1. So you don't think it's too drastic? Thanks for reading and commenting Dale.

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  3. The boss has become redundant. Good one!

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    1. And without a payout, just payback. Thanks Sandra I am glad you liked it.

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  4. Dear Subroto,

    Good thinking. The deeper the water the better where the boss is concerned. Nice one.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

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    1. And only in fiction, I don't change jobs this way :-) Thanks Rochelle I am glad you liked it.

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  5. This starts out so serenely then - oops, bye-bye boss. Well done.

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  6. I hope the boss was not a loan-shark, because in that case he might come back for a bite.

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    1. The is going to be fished out later. Thanks for your comments Björn.

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  7. That escalated quickly. Good story!

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  8. Anonymous5:39 PM

    That was pretty dark, Subroto! Excellent narration and great atmosphere. A strange sort of humor lurked beneath the surface of your story, despite its murky depths. Nicely done!
    ~Vijaya (formerly V-Hypnagogic Logic, now StrangeLander 2015 at http://magicsurrealist2013.me )

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    1. Thanks Vijaya I am glad you liked it,

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  9. That is an interesting way of dealing with ones boss. Good story.

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    1. But let it not become a habit. Thanks fore reading and commenting Loré.

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  10. Neat tale, but am I the only person who feels sorry for the boss?

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    1. He is in communion with Nature. Thanks for commenting Ce.

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  11. That's one way to get rid of your boss. I love how the peaceful mood switches into very dark humour.

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    1. One of the many ;-) Thanks for your comments Ga H.

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  12. Oh my. LOL. The underlings revenge. I thought this was another one about nature and all and then...

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    1. It was about nature, wasn't it? Thanks for reading and commenting Deborah.

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  13. Those concrete overshoes work every time. I love the way you set the stage so serenely before springing the punch line. Excellent job! Five stars.

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    1. Thanks Russell that is high praise indeed.

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  14. hope that boss was enjoying his morning "swim" :P

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    1. Maybe he was, at the bottom of the lake :-)
      Thank you for reading and commenting.

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  15. A nice morning and a nice ending to the boss. :-)

    Lily

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    1. Not for the boss though ;-) Thanks for reading and liking it Lily.

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  16. Nicely done. Freedom, of a sort!

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    1. Till it lasts. Then twenty years in some sort of secure cubicle. Thanks for reading and commenting Perry.

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  17. LOL. You left the twist till the end. I wasn't expecting that. I wonder after his monastic life how he will take having freedom to be out in the world or will he miss his boss.... Perhaps as you say above he may just be swapping one for another. Good piece.

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    1. There is always room for a twist in the tale :-) Thanks for your comments Irene, I am glad you liked it.

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  18. Shocking twist at the end. He didn't just quit did he? He must have "really" hated that job. Well done Subroto. ---- Suzanne

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    1. Maybe he just loves being the resident psychopath. Thanks for your comments Suzanne

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