Wednesday, December 24, 2014

Chronicle of the Nomad

PHOTO PROMPT – Copyright -Björn Rudberg

The grass grew in tussocks along the flight of stone stairs.  The moss clung to walls and the wild flowers that smelled like honey danced in the winter sun. 

The fort still conveyed a sense of lost grandeur, with its double-storied bastions and gigantic towers that housed within the grand palace and audience halls.   But nature was waging a war on the abandoned fort and winning.

In its place now stood a crumbling edifice fighting the vicissitudes of time.


(All your splendor will lie useless, when the nomad packs-up and leaves).

***
Written for Friday Fictioneers. Word Count : 100

When I wrote my last blog post Fragrance of Memories little did I know that I would be attending my mother's funeral in less than a week.  So when I saw this week's prompt of the crumbling ruins, I was reminded of these lines from Banjaranama that my mother used to often quote.

If you are a millionaire, and your stores are brimming,
Know, O ignorant! There is always another merchant who is even greater than you.
What of your sugar, candy, jaggery and nuts? What of your doughs, sweet and salty?
What of your grapes, raisins, ginger and pepper? What of your saffron, cloves and betel?
All your splendor will lie useless, when the nomad packs-up and leaves.


I will miss her but I am grateful to all these little nuggets that she left behind which remain close to my heart.

26 comments :

  1. So first of all my condolences - secondly the story with the hidden meening is so great. This week the stories are deeper than ever. Lovely

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  2. I'm so sorry for your loss. This is a difficult time of the year to lose someone. I loved your offering this week.

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  3. Dear Subroto,

    My heart goes out to you on your loss. Thank you for sharing her thoughts and wisdom. She must've been a wonderful lady to inspire such a lovely story.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

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    1. Thank you for your kind words Rochelle.

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  4. Please accept my sincerest compassion regarding the passing of your mother. I am sorry for your loss. Your story was a beautiful tribute to her.

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    1. Thank you for your kind words.

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  5. Sorry to hear your loss.
    I loved the story and the quote is superb.

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  6. I agree with Priceless Joy; a wonderful tribute to her memory.

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    1. Thank you for those comments.

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  7. A lovely tribute to your mother - I am so sorry she is gone. I haven't seen "tussocks" used for a long time. What a delightful word.

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  8. A wonderfully contemplative piece - a meditation on transience. My sympahty on the loss of your mother.

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  9. Subroto, I'm so sorry to hear of your recent loss. The poetic piece your mother so loved that inspired your own beautiful piece is marvelous and I'm glad you included it in its complete form along with the Hindi portion which was translated. --- Suzanne

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    1. Thank you for your kind words Susan.

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  10. I am so sorry for your loss yet happy to see you keeping your mother alive in the memories you retell. Lovely story this week with an even lovelier post script.

    May the New Year find you comforted whenever the loneliness creeps in.

    All my best,
    Marie Gail

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    1. Thanks Marie Gail much appreciated.

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  11. My deepest condolences, Subroto. May her soul rest in peace. The analogy of the fort is uncannily close. A great little piece as always.

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  12. My sincere condolences on your loss, Subroto. I'm just getting over a wicked flu, so I'm late in responding. This is a beautiful piece. I was struck with the poetry and those final lines, before I read your after note. I hope you continue to find healing in the gifts your mother left for you.

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    1. Thank you for your kind words Dawn.

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  13. I stepped back to read 'Fragrance of Memories', a portentous and poignant piece, penned as if you had a premonition. The extant post is a metaphor of life, a vain battle with nature whose outcome has been long foretold. Perhaps I can relate to your grief; I am sorry for your loss, my friend.

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    1. Thanks again Umashankar, much appreciated.

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